MAGIC STONES - The Secret World of Ancient Megaliths

Magic Stones documents, in stunning and evocative photographs, our ancestors’ obsession with stone. Throughout Europe stone has been used to create dwellings for the living and the dead, as a canvas for our earliest art, to celebrate the heavens and in ways that are still, even today, beyond our understanding. From the sun-drenched temples of Malta and the great tombs and alignments of Brittany to the labyrinths of icy Finland, this fascinating book explores these stones in their landscape, as part of nature and as a powerful reminder that, thousands of years on, they still hold a certain magic and mystery.


• The most wide-ranging photographic record of ancient European stone structures published to date
• An inspirational celebration of the beliefs and achievements of our ancient ancestors
• Features an authoritative introduction by leading archaeologist Julian Richards

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Emne Ældre kulturer
Kunstner Diverse
Forfatter POHRIBNY, Jan
Sprog Engelsk
Illustrationer 250 ill. i farver
Format / Sideantal 28 x 25 cm / 304
Udgivelsesår 2007
Indbinding Indbundet
Forlag Merrell
Antikvarisk
Antal
Køb
ISBN 9781858944135
Lev. 3 dage

Magic Stones documents, in stunning and evocative photographs, our ancestors’ obsession with stone. Throughout Europe stone has been used to create dwellings for the living and the dead, as a canvas for our earliest art, to celebrate the heavens and in ways that are still, even today, beyond our understanding. From the sun-drenched temples of Malta and the great tombs and alignments of Brittany to the labyrinths of icy Finland, this fascinating book explores these stones in their landscape, as part of nature and as a powerful reminder that, thousands of years on, they still hold a certain magic and mystery.


• The most wide-ranging photographic record of ancient European stone structures published to date
• An inspirational celebration of the beliefs and achievements of our ancient ancestors
• Features an authoritative introduction by leading archaeologist Julian Richards