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GRANDMA MOSES IN THE 21ST CENTURY

GRANDMA MOSES (Anna Mary Robertson Moses) 1860-1961

Grandma Moses and her paintings first came to public attention in 1940, when she was 80 years old. Her folk art, down-home personality, and background as a farmer and homemaker charmed the American public. By the time she died at the age of 101, she had completed over 1600 works of art and had established an international reputation.

The work of 'the white-haired girl', a self-taught artist who was a regular news feature for two decades, remained enormously popular at home and abroad even in the years after her death. For this reevaluation of the work of Grandma Moses, Jane Kallir contributes an authoritative introduction and presents a catalogue that illustrates 87 of Moses' most important works. Kallir traces Moses' development as an artist from the first embroidered landscapes to the glorious paintings of her 'old-age style'.

The Grandma Moses myth is tackled from various perspectives. Roger Cardinal examines the artist's working methods, exploring the relationship between the actual regional landscape and her interpretation of the area. Michael D.

Hall places Moses within the context of contemporary artistic and social movements of the 1940s and 1950s. Lynda Roscoe Hartigan reveals how memory and imagination merge in the paintings. And Judith E.

Stein discusses the role of gender in shaping the artist's reputation in the postwar years. This handsome volume is the catalogue for a major exhibition that will be seen during 2001-2002 at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C., the San Diego Museum of Art (California), the Orlando Museum of Art (Florida), the Brooklyn Museum of Art (New York), the Gilcrease Museum (Tulsa, Oklahoma), the Columbus Museum of Art (Ohio), and the Portland Art Museum (Oregon).

Pris ved 1 799,00 DKK

Emne Naivisterne
Kunstner MOSES, Grandma
Forfatter Jane Kallir
Sprog Engelsk tekst
Illustrationer 175 ill, heraf 95 i farver
Format / Sideantal 28 x 21 cm / 264 sider
Udgivelsesår 2001
Indbinding Indbundet
Forlag Yale University Press
Antikvarisk
Antal
Køb
ISBN 9780300089271
Lev. 3 dage

GRANDMA MOSES (Anna Mary Robertson Moses) 1860-1961

Grandma Moses and her paintings first came to public attention in 1940, when she was 80 years old. Her folk art, down-home personality, and background as a farmer and homemaker charmed the American public. By the time she died at the age of 101, she had completed over 1600 works of art and had established an international reputation.

The work of 'the white-haired girl', a self-taught artist who was a regular news feature for two decades, remained enormously popular at home and abroad even in the years after her death. For this reevaluation of the work of Grandma Moses, Jane Kallir contributes an authoritative introduction and presents a catalogue that illustrates 87 of Moses' most important works. Kallir traces Moses' development as an artist from the first embroidered landscapes to the glorious paintings of her 'old-age style'.

The Grandma Moses myth is tackled from various perspectives. Roger Cardinal examines the artist's working methods, exploring the relationship between the actual regional landscape and her interpretation of the area. Michael D.

Hall places Moses within the context of contemporary artistic and social movements of the 1940s and 1950s. Lynda Roscoe Hartigan reveals how memory and imagination merge in the paintings. And Judith E.

Stein discusses the role of gender in shaping the artist's reputation in the postwar years. This handsome volume is the catalogue for a major exhibition that will be seen during 2001-2002 at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C., the San Diego Museum of Art (California), the Orlando Museum of Art (Florida), the Brooklyn Museum of Art (New York), the Gilcrease Museum (Tulsa, Oklahoma), the Columbus Museum of Art (Ohio), and the Portland Art Museum (Oregon).